Frequently Asked Questions

Perhaps the most frequently asked questions are those which begin,
        "What does The Book say about ______?"
or
        "Is it true that The Book demands [or prohibits] ______?"

I have heard 25 years' worth of questions. There is a core set of questions which pop up so often that I call them "myths," that is, things which which are passed down from generation to generation by way of an oral tradition, but which are false, when compared to what "Robert's Rules of Order" truly says.

Below is list of common beliefs which are false according to the current edition of "Robert's Rules of Order". But, beware, if you have a customized rule, or if you are subject to a superior rule which says otherwise, then the "myth" might be true in your particular case, even as the myth contradicts what The Book says.


Top Ten Myths of Robert's Rules

ABSTRACT, "Top Ten Myths of Robert's Rules":

There are a set of mistaken assumptions or bad practices about what the true applicable rule is within the current edition of "Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised." All of the following statements are FALSE, per Robert's Rules:
(1.) "A majority equals 50% + 1"; (2.) "Abstentions count as 'aye' votes"; (3.) "A nominating committee member cannot be nominated"; (4.) "An officer must resign before running for a different office"; (5.) "Chairs cannot vote"; (6.) "Ex officio members cannot vote"; (7.) "A member cannot nominate himself"; (8.) "A member in 'good standing' has paid his dues"; (9.) "A husband/wife cannot both serve in office"; (10.) "Minutes must be approved before the actions take effect".

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Seven More Myths of Robert's Rules

ABSTRACT, "Seven More Myths of Robert's Rules":

There are many common misunderstandings about what the parliamentary rules of Robert's Rules of Order truly say. This article lists 7 such common erroneous assumptions, which the author calls "myths." The TRUE parliamentary rule is the following:
(1.) No installation ceremony is necessary for officers to take office. (2.) A "vote of no confidence" removes no one from office. (3.) Nominees cannot be ordered from the room. (4.) A person who is absent can be elected. (5.) It is improper to move that a committee report be accepted. (6.) Minutes are not to include the name of the seconder. (7.) Minutes are to be kept in closed session ("executive session")

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